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Important Individual changes from the 2016 Budget

Important Individual changes from the 2016 Budget

From 1 July 2016, the government will increase the 32.5% personal income tax threshold from $80,000to $87,000. This measure will reduce the marginal rate of tax on incomes between $80,000 and $87,000 from 37% to 32.5%, preventing around 500,000 taxpayers facing the 37% marginal tax rate.

 

The government will provide a full income tax exemption for Australian Defence Force personnel deployed on Operation PALATE II in Afghanistan. This income tax exemption has effect from 1 January 2016, and will remain in effect until 31 December 2016.

From 1 July 2017, the government will allow individuals with a superannuation balance of less than $500,000 to make additional concessional contributions where they have not reached their concessional contributions cap in previous years.

From 1 July 2017, the government will lower the annual cap on concessional superannuation contributions to $25,000. Until this time, the existing concessional contributions caps, being $30,000 for those aged under age 50 years, and $35,000 for those aged 50 years and over, will apply.

 

From 1 July 2017, the government will remove the current restrictions on people aged 65 to 74 from making superannuation contributions for their retirement. Specifically, the government will remove the requirement that an individual aged 65 to 74 must meet the ‘work test’ before making voluntary or non-concessional contributions to superannuation.

 

From 1 July 2017, the government will change the law to allow all individuals under age 75 to claim an income tax deduction for personal superannuation contributions. Individuals who are, for example, partially self-employed and partially wage and salary earners, and individuals whose employers do not offer salary sacrifice arrangements will benefit from the proposed changes.

Currently, Division 293 imposes an additional tax of 15% on certain concessionally taxed superannuation contributions. From 1 July 2017, the government will lower the Division 293 threshold (i.e., the point at which high income earners pay additional contributions tax of 15%) from $300,000 to $250,000

 

From 1 July 2017, the government will increase access to the low income spouse superannuation tax offset by raising the income threshold for the low income spouse to $37,000 (from $10,800). The offset is gradually reduced for income above this level and completely phases out at income above $40,000

 

From 1 July 2017, the government will introduce a Low Income Superannuation Tax Offset (‘LISTO’) to reduce tax on superannuation contributions for low income earners. The LISTO will provide a non-refundable tax offset to superannuation funds, based on the tax paid on concessional contributions made on behalf of low income earners, up to a cap of $500. The LISTO will apply to members with adjusted taxable income of up to $37,000 that have had a concessional contribution made on their behalf.